Author Archive

Hands Laid On | Kathy Tynan & Aileen Murphy | 07.01-30.01 2016

Written by Ingrid Lyons on . Posted in Exhibitions

 

In response to the question ‘why paint?’ featured in the January 2014 issue of frieze magazine, artist Ellen Altfest specified, ‘Looking over a long time is like an attempt to merge with something outside of oneself. The dense accumulation of visual information, which is the product of this kind of looking, is different from how the lens and the eye usually see the world.’

Through the activities of walking and looking Kathy Tynan identifies alternative landmarks in the city, places to rest the eyes that give rise to contemplation. Tynan observes and informally records visual quirks in her surroundings and such vagaries are later bestowed with temporal emphasis through the medium of paint. In the cracks of a pebble dashed wall and across a surface of uneven plaster, real word surfaces and textures appear elevated through keen observation. Slogans and symbols scrawled or sprayed across gable ends, crows looking on, trinkets in a stranger’s porch; all distract from the path ahead.

Aileen Murphy’s canvases are lurid and brassy with strong sweeping brush strokes that evoke activity and dance. Energy takes precedence as the painted image is contained but always threatens to breach the border of the canvas, a yellow interior emblazoned by broad swathes of blue paint depicts an athletically contorted woman mid-pirouette or falling. Murphy works from swiftly made drawings creating seamless gestures of movement. They are ‘feeling’ rather than ‘thinking’ paintings that are concerned with human emotion and the human condition in which tales of drama and lust abound.

Both Murphy and Tynan paint in a way that is frank and full of integrity, in which humour alternates with genuine pathos. Hands Laid On comprises paintings that relate to one another in a manner that is both reciprocal and divergent.

A publication will accompany this exhibition with a text by Ingrid Lyons. Full text available here. 

Aileen Murphy

Written by Ingrid Lyons on . Posted in Artists, News

 

 

‘Samual Beckett’s 1972 play Not I is known for its simple yet evocative production. A stage in total darkness save for a mouth illuminated by spotlight appears floating in the void- the vast blackness of the stage intensifies the feeling of frenzy and breathless panic that the mouth conveys through fragmented orations ‘. . . . . out . . . into this world . . . this world . . . tiny little thing . . . before its time . . . in a godfor– . . . what? . . girl? . . yes . . . tiny little girl . . . into this . . . out into this . . . before her time . . . godforsaken hole called . . .’ It is a short dramatic monologue where the words are spit forth in quick succession with no face or body adding context-only hovering orifice of lips, teeth, tongue and gums. Murphy’s paintings often feature singular body parts that hover and dance. The organs and body parts that grope and fumble evoke a nervous angst. Energy takes precedence as the painted image is contained but always threatens to breach the border of the canvas. They are ‘feeling’ rather than ‘thinking’ paintings that are concerned with human emotion and the human condition.

 

Murphy’s painting A Mouth that Pines pictures a face, flushed and blotchy – the eyes appear to be glazed maybe with tears. Two strategically placed blue dots on each eye suggest a glassy twinkle. It might be the moment before a torrent of briny water bursts over lids and spills onto molten cheeks. In Mildred Rasher Bean two fists push upwards defiantly against a bean shaped head – clenched fists meet the receptively soft flesh of the face. Mouth agape and bellowing, the eyelids recede into the depths of the eye sockets encouraged by a small hook. There is a sense of anticipation, tension and a growing mania. Murphy’s large-scale compositions seem to capture the point at which these figures reach a fit of pique then fragment.’

 

-Extracted from Within and Without by Ingrid Lyons

view artist’s website

Links to previous shows

Naked Cheerleaders in my Chest; Deborah Schamoni Gallery; 2.12.17-3.3.17

The Limited Sphere, 321 Gallery, New York, Jan 30-March12 2016

Hands Laid On, Jan 7th- 30th 2016 ‎

Sean Lynch

Written by Ingrid Lyons on . Posted in News

Sean Lynch

Ireland at Venice

Adventure:Capital The Irish Tour

21 January – 24 March 2016, Limerick City Gallery of Art.

9 April – 5 June 2016, The Model, Sligo.

30 June – 14 August 2016, Royal Hibernian Academy, Dublin.

1 September – 15 October 2016, Golden Thread Gallery, Belfast.

The Pavilion of Ireland at the 56th International Art Exhibition – La Biennale di Venezia – presented work by Irish artist Sean Lynch from May until November of 2015. The exhibition Adventure: Capital traces a journey from myth to minimalism around Ireland and Britain. Combining sculptural, video and archival elements. Lynch forensically investigates anecdotes, hearsay and half-truths, unearthing marginalised stories that have been overlooked or fallen by the wayside. His idiosyncratic, yet meticulous research and fieldwork, absorbs these disparate fragments – social and cultural blind spots – and forms them into alternative arrangements of history, opening up new understandings of our world.

 

 

Mick O’Dea

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Imperial City

 

The Foggy Dew

Royal Hibernian Academy, Dublin
January 15th – February 21st, 2016
Mick O’Dea PRHA will present an installation of sculpture and paintings at the RHA in an exhibition that opens on January 15th. O’Dea is known for his paintings that relate to Irish History as well as his use of images culled from found and researched photographs. The Foggy Dew follows on from O’ Dea’s trilogy of exhibitions that were held at the Kevin Kavanagh Gallery; Black and Tan in 2010, Trouble in 2012 and The Split in 2014 covering the periods 1919 to 1923 in Ireland. The Foggy Dew represents an increasingly subjective take on the events surrounding the Rising.The exhibition will be accompanied by a catalogue with an essay by Trinity College historian Ciaran O’Neill, co-published with Ballina Arts Centre and Mayo County County Council. A version of the exhibition will be shown in Ballinglen Art Foundation, Ballycastle and Ballina Arts Centre in late July and August 2016.

More information available here

Paul Mckinley Artist’s Talk

Written by Ingrid Lyons on . Posted in News

Paul McKinley 'Bunker' Detail 02-a4fca6fa0a

 

Paul McKinley in Conversation with Ingrid Lyons, Saturday 5th of December at 12.30pm.

Kevin Kavanagh is pleased to announce the release of a new publication commissioned by the gallery on the occasion of Hanuman, an exhibition of recent work by Paul McKinley. The launch of the publication will take place on Saturday the 5th of December at 12.30pm. Paul McKinley will discuss the development of ideas that led to the current exhibition Hanuman.

In the months leading up to the exhibition Paul McKinley entered into a correspondence with literary journalist, UN spokesperson and author of The Cage, Gordon Weiss. McKinley’s work has often been influenced by journalistic practices as he researches and utilises second hand source material to inform his own practice. Owing to this dynamic The Cage was a source of inspiration given that Weiss experienced the civil war first hand and has written extensively on the matter. Weiss has produced a text for the publication in which he approaches McKinley’s work through his own thoroughly researched understanding of the final days of the Sri-Lankan civil war.

All are welcome and coffee will be available before and after the talk. Admission to this event is free.

Hanuman | Paul McKinley | 19.11-19.12 2015

Written by Ingrid Lyons on . Posted in Exhibitions

Hanuman, November 2015

In this exhibition of recent works Paul McKinley refers to the history and folklore of Sri Lanka to inform his paintings. Hanuman details a period of Sri Lankan history, focusing on the last days of a civil war that ended in 2009. In the grassy verges and lush thickets, guerilla fighters – men and boys – lay hidden in bunkers enshrouded by dense foliage. They fought in the overgrown forests and ditches of the north Sri Lankan landscape. Hanuman is also the name of a central character of the Hindu epic Ramayana. McKinley observes and comments upon the manner in which an epic poem such as the Ramayana still has the ability to drive political action. In drawing a parallel between the two, McKinley seeks to emphasise dormant narratives that lie in the landscape and thus he presents us with a history of the area-twice told, through the violent conflict of 2009 and through the bitter feuds of the ancient Ramayana.

Through this series of paintings McKinley pursues an investigation into the phenomenon of ‘dark tourism’ in places where major trauma has occurred and the proximity of idyllic tourist trails to scenes of extreme violence. Though McKinley has focused on the idea of ‘dark tourism’ in the past, this is the first time that he has referenced a narrative that has elements of the fantastical, with universal, transcendental themes. Working from source material acquired by people visiting or living in the area he considers the development of images as they are created, passed on and re-purposed. In doing this he approaches the differences between recording and representing, documenting and describing.

Owing to the strong connections between the paintings and their narrative referents a special text has been commissioned by the gallery to accompany the exhibition. Literary journalist, former United Nations official and author of The Cage, Gordon Weiss has liaised with Paul McKinley to write an essay that further contextualises the work and illuminates the dark days of the Sri Lankan civil war.

Paul McKinley (b. 1973) Birmingham, England, graduated from Sheffield Hallam University in 1996. McKinley has exhibited widely in Ireland and abroad at art fairs such as Volta Basel in 2013. Recent solo exhibitions include Gacaca, RHA, Dublin 2014, Operation Turquoise, Kevin Kavanagh, Dublin, 2013 and Palisade, Third Space Gallery, Belfast, 2011. McKinley has also taken part in many group exhibitions including Periodical Review # 3, Pallas Projects, Dublin, 2013 and Interlude (Aspects of Irish landscape painting), The Douglas Hyde Gallery, Dublin, 2011. Mckinley was awarded the Credit Union Painting Prize in Claremorris Open 2015, an Arts Council Bursary in 2014 and The Nissan Art Project in 2007. His work is held in many important public collections including the OPW and AIB as well private collections in Ireland and across Europe.

Finders Keepers

Written by Ingrid Lyons on . Posted in News

Stephen-Loughman-Jonas-2-oil-on-gesso-panel-45-x-35-cm-2013-crop

Finders Keepers, an exhibition of artworks from the State Art Collection and featuring work by Stephen Loughman and Paul Nugent, runs at dlr Lexicon, Dun Laoghaire, Ireland, until January 16th, 2016. More info can be found here. 

Ulrich Vogl

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Ulrich Vogl SOX show

Coming soon, a solo exhibition by Ulrich Vogl, is on show at Sox Berlin until December 4th 2015. More info can be found here.

Ulrich Vogl Freitag 13 show

Vogl also has work in Freitag, der 13, a group exhibition at Circle1, Berlin, running until December 19th, (more info here), and in If On A Winter’s Night at Galleria Comunale d’Arte Contemporanea, Monfalcone, until January 10th, 2016 (more info here).

 

GREY·WHITE·KLEE | Agnes de Vlin | 10.11-14.11 2015

Written by Ingrid Lyons on . Posted in Exhibitions

GREY·WHITE·KLEE

10 – 14 November, 2015.
Opening Tuesday 10 November, 6pm

Irish Design is a yearlong initiative that aims to raise the profile of Irish design by increasing awareness of the value of design in all aspects of life. The Kevin Kavanagh gallery, designed by architect Philip Crowe of MCO Projects, is one of the few purpose built art spaces in Ireland. In celebration of Design Week 2015 Kevin Kavanagh will host a presentation by Agnes de Vlin that will run for one week as part of Irish Design 2015.

De Vlin comes from a multi-disciplinary background with formal training in graphics, sculpture and print. De Vlin’s Patterns and Visual compositions evidence a curiosity for harmony and synchronicity that occurs within synthesized as well as natural patterns. Her designs arise out of a process of observation, drawing, focusing in and beginning again – they are complex though not complicated. She is continually researching the rhythmic devices apparent in repeat patterns and through her designs she articulates transient characteristics that extend beyond symmetry, repetition and scale. Throughout this presentation, De Vlin responds to the visual codes of the art gallery by heightening the interplay between grey, white and the tonal range that exists in between. De Vlin has worked with The Store Yard on a number of refurbishment projects under the name F·O·U·N·D @The Storeyard and a selection of these pieces will be included as functional components of the presentation.

Elaine Byrne

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22_endless-resistance2014-wood-and-single-cell-foam-290x204x108inch-Elaine Byrne has been short listed for the Celeste prize in Milan for ‘Endless
Reistance’ which was shown at the Limerick City gallery of art.

A team of international jurors, led by Koyo Kouoh selected the finalists from thousands of applications from 72 different countries.

The finalist exhibition will be held in Milan at ex-BAZZI from 14 to 22 November 2015 with the prize winners being announced on 14th November.

More information can be found here.

Sean Lynch

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5Sean Lynch has curated an exhibition ‘Reverse! Pugin’ at Lismore Castle Arts, Waterford.

Reverse! Pugin is a group exhibition that will run from the 23rd of October until the 6th of December 2015.

More information can be found here

Paul Nugent

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Paul Nugent 'Solanum Book V'Paul Nugent will show new work at Solstice Arts Centre, Navan as part of an exhibition entitled ‘ In Darkness Let Me Dwell’. The three person exhibition also features work by Patrick Jolley and Gary Coyle.

More information can be found here

HOLD TO THE NOW

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Stephen Loughman, Sinéad Ní Mhaonaigh, Geraldine O’Neill

SLAG Gallery, 81 Grand St, Williamsburg, New York
October 16th – November 15th, 2015.

Opening Friday October 16th, 6 – 8pm

SLAG Gallery is pleased to present a group exhibition of three Irish artists. Stephen Loughman, Sinéad Ní Mhaonaigh, and Geraldine O’Neill take paint as their medium though with vastly different results, each granting sophisticated articulations that span a broad range of interests. These three highly regarded artists have sought out a unique language of their own through paint, though in three very different ways.
Stephen Loughman paints peculiarly unpeopled scenes that hint towards recent or imminent activity. A pervading sense of vastness and spaciousness infers a manipulation of time and space through the medium of paint. The paintings are often developed from film stills and are latently indicative of an underlying cinematic narrative. There is a tension – a sense of anticipation that exaggerates and prolongs the present, drawing it out into a more expansive temporal plane.

Sinéad Ní Mhaonaigh’s exuberant and lively paintings are abstract though there are obvious truths at play. Colour, pattern, form and structure appear convincing yet obfuscated by further application of paint. They are sumptuous and unapologetically painterly objects. Ní Mhaonaigh’s works intuitively allow the texture and tone of paint to inform each gesture. Though they could be considered abstract they are evocative of sensory overload, of a glut of visual information combined with optical distortion. It is as though a number of images converge and recede and Ní Mhaonaigh’s paintings capture this optical and cognitive process as it occurs.

Geraldine O’Neill’s paintings absorb a plethora of genres in response to various art historical interests yet they are simultaneously personal and sensitive in their subject matter. Embedded in these paintings is an acknowledgement of paint in its resilience through the passing of time, both in the history of western painting and in the artist’s personal history. Through layers of varying gestures O’Neill creates a multi-surfaced montage that declares an excitement for and fascination with the possibilities of paint.

Made possible with support from Culture Ireland. More info on the exhibition can be found here.

NIGHTSHADE | Paul Nugent | 08.10-07.11 2015

Written by Ingrid Lyons on . Posted in Exhibitions

 

Kevin Kavanagh is pleased to present NIGHTSHADE, an exhibition of new work by Paul Nugent.

NIGHTSHADE is a series of paintings that present a change of direction within Nugent’s practice. In previous works he has often painted lavish interiors in which objects chime and resonate in their surroundings. They tremor and glimmer leaving behind a ghostly imprint of their movements. Patterns that appear in these paintings are often reminiscent of oriental tapestries and textiles evoking a sense of grandeur. Such grandeur in interiors of the western world infers the appropriation of oriental design and motif through exploration, travel and colonisation. In this new series of paintings we can see that Nugent has focused on various aspects that have previously occurred within his oeuvre. His investigation into symbolism and significant motifs throughout art history have become more imminent in the work as though he has entered the paintings and become immersed and absorbed in detailed fragments within.

In NIGHTSHADE Nugent has gilded the surface of the canvas to venerate humble images of weeds and brambles. In this regard he considers the manner in which we assign value and on the impact of using such a prized material. Gold and yellow leaf also conjures the use of such materials in icon painting to depict light emanating from a sacred object or person. Within an art historical context gold holds a semiotic position that communicates ritualistic uses and Nugent avails of this connotation to elevate the lowly nightshade. Another painting, Silver forest, depicts a dying forest or woods rendered in silver detail on a dark background and in the artists own words ‘the plant or motif glows within the surrounding silver and symbolises a kind of regeneration, a good omen perhaps’.

Though his new series of paintings appear different from previous work; it is not a complete departure from his practice to date but rather a continuation of his investigation of symbolism in imagery as well as in the materials used. He continues to manipulate the painted surface through layering, illusion, simulation and depth. With Nugent’s work there is always a sense that the painted surface is hiding something, that preceding layers have been veiled and that hidden elements may reveal themselves over time spent looking at each composition.

Paul Nugent (b.1964) lives and works in Dublin. He graduated from The National College of Art and Design with a BA in Fine Art Painting. Nugent has exhibited widely both in Ireland and abroad. Recent solo exhibitions include a presentation at VOLTANY, New York (2011) as well as Remembrance Part I & II, Kevin Kavanagh and Dublin Remembrance, Kerava Art Museum, Finland (2009).

Nugent’s work was included in Trove (2014) at IMMA, curated by Dorothy Cross. Nugent’s work is held in many private and public collections including the Irish Museum of Modern Art, the Office of Public Works and Dublin City University.

The Longest Road | Oliver Comerford | 03.09-03.10 2015

Written by Ingrid Lyons on . Posted in Exhibitions

the longest road comprises an exhibition of recent paintings by Oliver Comerford in which the open road and the surrounding landscape furnishes a meditation on points of intersection between photography, film and painting. These small-scale paintings are fundamentally autobiographical in the sense that Comerford tends only to paint places that he himself has passed through and this serves to heighten the associative value of the work. Personal experience forms part of the narrative as the source material consists of many thousand photographs, indicating the significance of encountering such scenes first hand. These photographs are edited and distilled through the medium of paint, evoking a sense of placelessness, yet despite this ambiguity the paintings retain a level of familiarity and resonance.

Much of this familiarity exists because a road or a path has often stood as an analogy for the avenues we choose in life. Colours and shapes merge and mesh, picturing a fleeting landscape from the vantage point of a moving vehicle. These paintings propel a sense of acceleration, implying that the landscape that escapes into our peripheral vision is now in the past. Through the painted medium, imagery of uniform highways and liminal commute zones are elevated, encompassing broader, more philosophical contemplations.

Extracted from ‘To Begin, Begin’ 

– Ingrid Lyons is an artist and writer based in Dublin

Amanda Coogan

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The Fall

I’ll sing you a song from around the town, a retrospective of the work of Amanda Coogan, will run at the Royal Hibernian Academy from September 4th – October 18th, 2015.

Opening reception Thursday September 3rd, 6pm. More information can be found here.

The retrospective was reviewed in The Irish Times by Aidan Dunne on the 8th of September. The article can be read here.

VOLTA11| Basel | 2015

Written by Ingrid Lyons on . Posted in Art Fairs

This year during Art Basel Kevin Kavanagh was pleased to present work by Geraldine O’Neill, Diana Copperwhite, Paul Nugent, Sinéad Ní Mhaonaigh, Tadhg McSweeney and Vanessa Donoso López at Volta 11.