Author Archive

Mick O’Dea

Written by Ingrid Lyons on . Posted in News

Mick O’Dea will launch the exhibition, From Edge To Edge, in Glór, Ennis, Co.Clare on Friday December 9th at 6.30pm. The exhibition features work by Mick O’Dea, Aideen Barry, Brian Bourke, Barrie Cooke, John Gibbons, Seán Keating, Tom Molloy, Sidney Nolan, Deirdre O’Mahony, Jean Regan, Camille Souter and Samual Walsh.

More information can be found here

 

Alice Maher

Written by Ingrid Lyons on . Posted in News

rwa_angela-carter_strange-worlds_alice-maher_cassandras-necklace_galleryWork by Alice Maher is being shown as part of Strange Worlds: The Vision of Angela Carter at the Royal West of England Academy, from December 10th 2016 – March 19th 2017.

More information can be found here.

Slips and Glimpses | Robert Armstrong & Anna Bjerger | 17.11 – 17.12 2016

Written by Ingrid Lyons on . Posted in Exhibitions

Painters have a complex relationship with their source material. While it provides them with vital information and can often stimulate certain illuminating reactions within them, it can also act as a self-imposed limit, which, once introduced, must be escaped from. Slips and Glimpses, an exhibition of new work by Anna Bjerger and Robert Armstrong delivers moments of both vivid immersion and profound escape.

Bjerger’s paintings often reference found imagery such as old magazine clippings. While the figures and objects which populate her paintings may seem largely unrelated, they are connected by a curious sense of timelessness. Or rather, that they exist in a time to which they do not belong. Through her paintings Bjerger provides a home for these displaced images, while simultaneously pointing to their outsider status. Their treatment is at once tender and removed. Cotton, for instance, depicts the torsos of two children wearing white t-shirts. One of the children’s t-shirts appears to be spattered with blood. But on closer inspection, the spatters extend extra-diegetically onto the t-shirt of the second child in a manner that could only have been made by the external hand of the painter. This deceptively simple gesture creates a mysterious tension between the world within the painting and that without. Such devices serve to both disorient and intrigue, allowing us glimpses into moments of great intimacy, to which we remain none the wiser.

Similarly, Armstrong’s paintings act as a space in which time and reality are made lusciously slippery. Drawing on sources such as masterworks from art history, ancient archeological sites and biblical narratives, Armstrong’s worlds both collide and withdraw. The cloud, a recurring motif in paintings such as A Cloud for Sigiriya and Humility after MW will often act as a unifier of these many worlds, bringing together earth and sky, figuration and abstraction, past and present, by floating or resting gently in their interim. Armstrong’s paintings search through the unknowable terrains of the past. But through his energetic and gleefully inventive use of paint, it is always the unforeseen, the strange, the new that emerges.

This exhibition combines the practices of two greatly accomplished painters, whose mutual admiration and respect for one another and for their chosen medium is distinctly evident. Through their work, both painters offer a surface on which content and materiality is treated with equal importance. Within these paintings, the origin and its varying forms of transition can safely co-exist, undisturbed by the passing of time and its consequences.

Anna Bjerger (b.1973) lives and works in Älmhult, Sweden. She has recently held solo exhibitions in David Risley Gallery, Copenhagen, 2016, Galleri Magnus Karlsson, Stockholm, 2015 and Galleria Monica de Cardenas, Milan, 2014. Her works are held in many collections, including Louisiana Museum of Modern Art (DK), Moderna Museet (SE), Zabludowicz Collection (UK) and Stedelijk Museum, (NE). Bjerger is represented by David Risley Gallery, Copenhagen and Galerie Magnus Karlsson, Stockholm.

Robert Armstrong (b.1953) lives and works in Dublin. Armstrong is Head of Painting in the National College of Art and Design and is a Founder Member of Temple Bar Gallery & Studios, Dublin. Recent solo exhibitions include a presentation at VOLTA New York (2015), and Assumptions (2014) Kevin Kavanagh Gallery, Dublin.

VUE | Dublin | 2016

Written by Ingrid Lyons on . Posted in Art Fairs

Kevin Kavanagh was pleased to participate in Vue Contemporary Art Fair at the Royal Hibernian Academy from November 3rd – 6th. The presentation featured work by Robert Armstrong, Dermot Seymour, Sonia Shiel, Sinéad Ní Mhaonaigh, Mick O’Dea, Diana Copperwhite, Alice Maher, Agnes De Vlin, Tadhg McSweeney and Kathy Tynan.

Ulrich Vogl

Written by Ingrid Lyons on . Posted in News

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Alongside Hannah Beck-Mannagetta, Ulrich Vogl has curated the exhibition Never Shown on Purpose, opening 4th November, running until 14th January in CIRCLE1, Berlin

Diana Copperwhite

Written by Ingrid Lyons on . Posted in News

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Diana Copperwhite’s exhibition, Depend on the Morning Sun, runs from October 27th till December 17th in  Gallery Thomas Jaeckel, 532 W 25th St, New York

Mick O’Dea

Written by Ingrid Lyons on . Posted in News

m-cullen-2Work by Mick O’Dea is on show in Real Real, as part of the Imagine Arts Festival, Waterford from 20th – 30th October. More information can be found here.

WI | Stephen Loughman | 13.10- 12.11 2016

Written by Ingrid Lyons on . Posted in Exhibitions

Kevin Kavanagh presents WI, an exhibition of new paintings by Stephen Loughman

 

And did those feet in ancient time
Walk upon England’s mountain green?
And was the holy Lamb of God
On England’s pleasant pastures seen?
And did the countenance divine
Shine forth upon our clouded hills?
And was Jerusalem builded here
Among those dark satanic mills?

– from Jerusalem by William Blake

 

WI comprises a suite of recent paintings by Stephen Loughman that take vintage postcards
issued by the Women’s institute as their source material and subject matter. The use of such
postcards, which were bought in bulk at online auctions, represent a departure from Loughman’s
previous method of painting from film stills and yet the work retains a filmic quality. Images of
the English countryside appear lushly detailed though curiously deadpan and while the source
material documents picturesque landscapes, their corresponding paintings appear densely
ominous, as plotted points within a broader narrative.

A history of the Women’s Institute spanning over one hundred years includes the suffragette
movement which began in 1913 as well as their contribution to the war effort during both World
War I and World War II. At the beginning of the 1920s the institution adopted Jerusalem as their
anthem. Originally written by William Blake in 1804, the poem celebrates ‘England’s green and
pleasant land’ and centers on rural countryside as the utopian ideal.

Within WI visual motifs become apparent; tunnels, bridges and arches reference architectural
intervention in the landscape as churches and thatched cottages are depicted amidst verdant
forests and gardens. In an art historical context the depiction of the English countryside has long
been bound up with national identity, and has continually acted as a cypher for collective
consciousness. In her book Wanderlust, Rebecca Solnit wrote, ‘At the beginning of the eighteenth
century, English aristocrats had linked nature with reason and the current social order, suggesting
that things were as they should be. But nature was a dangerous goddess to enthrone. At the latter
end of the century, Rousseau and romanticism equated nature, feeling, and democracy,
portraying the social order as highly artificial and making revolt against class privilege “only
natural” (Solnit, R, 2014, p109).

Loughman’s decision to work with postcards made by members of the Women’s Institute
alludes to the social history of an organisation in which the word ‘domestic’ has been applied not
only to the home but to the home country and the idea of nationhood. By referring to such
source material, Loughman connects aspirations towards patriotism and religion with the English
landscape and in this way the use of such imagery alludes to class structuring and social order.

Through time spent with Loughman’s paintings, it begins to emerge that a history has been
obfuscated or perhaps veneered. These seemingly idyllic images appear constricted – imbued
with a sense of unease or discomfort. The implication of such a device within WI attests to
Loughman’s ability to connect the depiction of rural England with its simultaneous social history
and, as in the artist’s previous work, to modify or drastically alter the mood or tone of an image
through the medium of paint.

Mick O’Dea

Written by Ingrid Lyons on . Posted in News

odea-mick-stephen-821da1Mick O’ Dea’s portrait of Stephen McKenna is featured in ”Tradition and Innovation” a selection of work from the RHA collection as part of the Clifden Arts Festival. More information can be found here.

Alice Maher

Written by Ingrid Lyons on . Posted in News

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The Glorious Maid of the Charnel House, an exhibition of new watercolour drawings by Alice Maher, is at Purdy Hicks, London, from September 21st – October 15th. More information, including the new location of Purdy Hicks, can be found here.

Paul McKinley

Written by Ingrid Lyons on . Posted in News

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Work by Paul McKinley is included in COE ’16 New Century Retro – A Selection of COE Prizewinners, curated by Helen O’Donoghue. More info can be found here.

Disguise The Limit | Nevan Lahart | 08.09 – 08.10 2016

Written by Ingrid Lyons on . Posted in Exhibitions

Kevin Kavanagh is pleased to present Disguise the Limit, an exhibition of new work by Nevan Lahart.

The paintings in Disguise the Limit are serenely beautiful. Lahart pictures the vast expanse of the sky; initially appearing as traditional skyscapes, this contextualisation is swiftly derailed by the inclusion of strange and suspicious cloud formations. Jet streams left in the wake of unseen aircraft allude to nefarious activities and environmental interventions. Plumes, halos, and streams of condensation cling to currents at various altitudes to create an array of patterns in which peculiar anthropomorphic swirls occur and ominous shapes evoke changes in the atmosphere.

Through the medium of paint, Lahart illuminates the signs and signifiers in our immediate environment that often elude us. His work utilises a wide variety of materials to pose questions on topics that interest him. This recent suite of paintings, in which strange shapes appear in the sky incorporate his interest in alternative histories. Through the work, he emphasises the dynamic that exists between fabrication and fact. By considering Lahart’s practice in this context, it can be regarded as a means of discussing and challenging histories and mechanisms of power that are often determinately approved as fact.

Lahart challenges our propensity to form a consensus on events and thus relegate them to false history and through Disguise the Limit, he encourages us to question the avenues of information in which we blindly trust. Many of the installations and paintings within this exhibition urge us to consider other ways of knowing, other ways of coming to terms with the world around us. His work beckons us to pay attention to alternative theories and their potential to tell us truths that have been obscured in the past for reasons both benign and malevolent.

I really don’t feel them | Carl Giffney | 01.09 – 03.09 2016

Written by Ingrid Lyons on . Posted in Exhibitions

 

 

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I really don’t feel them | Carl Giffney

1hr 37mins, HD video + stereo, (2016).

I really don’t feel them is a 3 day event at Kevin Kavanagh gallery. Its central work is a feature length documentary movie by the same name, shot in The Netherlands, Scotland and Finland, produced by Carl Giffney.

The movie will be screened on the big screen once each evening at a seated viewing starting at 18.00hr. Free tickets can be booked by contacting Kevin Kavanagh gallery directly. An exhibition of printed video stills expand the event. I really don’t feel them and its related projects were made across five residencies within Frontiers In Retreat (2013 – 2018), a five year collaborative residency project across seven EU countries funded by the EU Culture Fund.

For further information please visit www.carlgiffney.com and www.frontiersinretreat.org

You can view the full film here.

 

Ozymandias | Vogl, Scullion & McSweeney | 04.08 – 27.08 2016

Written by Ingrid Lyons on . Posted in Exhibitions

 

Kevin Kavanagh is pleased to present Ozymandias, a group exhibition of new work by Ulrich Vogl, Joe Scullion and Tadhg McSweeney.

This exhibition comprises a series of works that approach the idea of fictional architecture; worlds within worlds. Each of the artists have cultivated a practice that incorporates the act of rendering. Constructed spaces, aspects of architecture and illusion are explored in various mediums.

Abstraction and fragmentation are used to describe and deconstruct space and the forms that occupy that space. McSweeney’s work often contains elements of older works, painted surfaces and parts of preexisting sculptures. They represent a history of the artist’s own practice contained within each new piece. Scullion creates maquettes and models, which recur in his paintings as fictional monuments. For both artists, each work gives rise to another work in a practice that is generative and reciprocal. In many of Vogl’s installations there is a similar preoccupation with fabrication and invention in which fragments are reorganised to create fictional narratives through light and shadow.

The work of the three artists appears to collide and merge. Figuratively, the works support each other and pose questions on the nature of building, invention, structure and composition. Surface, reflection and shadow each play a role in suggesting various realities and illusions. The exhibition explores a sense of the Utopian in its etymological meaning, ‘eu topos’ or ‘no place’ and evokes the Utopian as a fictional realm, questioning our assumptions around fragmentation and construction in the built environment and subsequently how we interact with that environment.

Ulrich Vogl

Written by Ingrid Lyons on . Posted in News

Das Rheinrad, a gigantic “medieval film machine” by Ulrich Vogl will hang over the Rhine river in Constance, Germany until June 2017. The project is part of the official 600 year anniversary of the Council of Constance.

 

Ulrich Vogl and Elaine Byrne

Written by Ingrid Lyons on . Posted in News

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PERIPHERIES Centre for Creative Development, Gory School of Art.

The PERIPHERIES 2016 exhibition is a group show including the work of Elaine Byrne and Ulrich Vogl as well as a collaborative work from Oisin Byrne and Patrick Hough.

Opening Reception Friday 29th July 7.30pm. Gallery opening times 11am-6pm. Sat 30th July-Mon 1st of August

More information available in the PERIPHERIES programme.

 

Sinéad Ní Mhaonaigh

Written by Ingrid Lyons on . Posted in News

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THE MARMITE PRIZE FOR PAINTING V

OPENING & ARTISTS’ TALKS FRIDAY 8/9 JULY

8 Jul 2016 – 10 Sep 2016

Sinéad Ní Mhaonaigh will take part in a group exhibition at Highlanes Galley as part of The Marmite Prize for Painting V. Thirty nine works from artists from Ireland, UK, the US and mainland Europe feature in this year’s exhibition, and were selected from over 1,200 entries from painters at all stages in their practice.

The Marmite V exhibition features works by Albane Lamoril, Richard Baker, Sarah Ball, Anthony Banks, Juan Bolivar, Philip Booth, Eleanor Breeze, Hannah Brown, Jo Bruton, Michael Calver, Diane Chappalley, Emma Cousin, Billy Crosby, Chris Daniels, Amanda Doran, Tamara Dubnyckyj, Steven Gee, Max Gomes, John Greenwood, Mandy Hudson, Clare Jarrett, Sooim Jeong, Michael Johnson, Jessie Makinson, Lindsay Mapes, Kathryn Maple, José Batista Marques, Jo McGonigal, Sinéad Ní Mhaonaigh, Oliver Mulvihill, Helen O’Leary, Bernadette O’Toole, Selma Parlour, Alison Pilkington, Christiane Pooley, Sheila Rennick, Joan Sugrue, Suzy Willey, and Daniel Woolhouse.

The exhibition launches at Highlanes Gallery on Friday 8 July at 7.30pm, with opening remarks given by artist Mark O’Kelly. A talk, led by artist and Marmite co-founder Marcus Cope and featuring a number of exhibiting artists, including Emma Cousin, Alison Pilkington, Joan Sugrue and Steven Gee, Clare Jarrett will take place the following day on Saturday 9 July at 11am. The exhibition continues until 10 September.

More information available here.

Sean Lynch

Written by Ingrid Lyons on . Posted in News

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Sean Lynch Adventure: Capital, Ireland at Venice.
The Irish Tour at the Royal Hibernian Academy
July 08, 2016 – August 21, 2016
RHA Gallery II

Combining sculpture, video and graphic elements, Adventure: Capital explores the allegories and underlying narratives of the contemporary architectural and social environment through encounters with the sculptures of John Burke, the quarries of Cornwall, megalithic ‘cursing’ stones, urban vandalism, and Irish Free State banknotes.

Alongside Adventure: Capital, Lynch presents a new video installation, Campaign to Change the National Monuments Acts, 2016 that investigates the legal status of metal detectors in Ireland. Following national controversy around the finding of the Derrynaflan Hoard, a medieval treasure trove uncovered in the 1980s, the state hastily placed a blanket ban on the public use of all devices used to search for archaeological objects. This legislation effectively destroyed the fledgling Irish metal detectorist community of Ireland. Using the tropes of a promotional video, Campaign to Change the National Monuments Acts advocates for a change in these authoritarian laws, where ideas of nationhood, individual freedom, and the need for new forms of community-led heritage are all explored on a journey narrated by Lynch’s long-time collaborator Gina Moxley.