Author Archive

Mick O’Dea

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A Name Unmade: Francis Ledwidge (1887-1917)

Solstice Arts Centre, Level 3 Gallery

28th April – 16th June, 2017, Tuesday – Saturday 11am – 4pm

Mick O’Dea will take part in a group exhibition marking the centenary of the death of Francis Ledwidge. The exhibition, titled A Name Unmade: Francis Ledwidge (1887-1917), will also feature work by Sven Anderson, Patricia Burns, David Farrell, Clare Langan, Niamh O’Malley and Sasha Sykes, Curated by Sabina Mac Mahon (Curator in Residence at Solstice Arts Centre).

More information available here.

Stephan Loughman

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DIG?

Connolly House – Marino College of Further Education.

30th March to 6th April

Stephan Loughman is currently exhibiting a series of paintings at Connolly House, Dublin.

Further information available here.

Mark Swords

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The Living and the Dead

15 April – 17 June 2017

Temple Bar Gallery + Studios presents a solo exhibition of recent works by Mark Swords. For Temple Bar Gallery + Studios, Mark Swords has created theatrically staged paintings that have come into being through a series of gestures that juxtapose the idea of making and unmaking. The paintings, often overwhelming in chromatic saturation and design denote the artist’s instinctive knowledge of colour. Layers of mark-making create a screen through which the buried undertones and colours emerge. He consistently moves between abstraction and figuration looking for discoveries and accidents in his works, appropriating painting conventions to create a stylistic collage.  The hand-made is a significant element in his practice, printed fabrics are stitched to the canvas creating layers of shapes and forms, while the paint application can be both refined or crudely impasto. Within some of the paintings he has used draped curtains to create a framing device. A painted backdrop pinned to the wall becomes the larger framework for the paintings. These framing devices anchor the work in a celestial sphere creating associations between the paintings while playing with ideas of display and exhibition making, Swords creates a complex mosaic of works that can be viewed as a whole or singularly.

Artist Mark Swords will participate in a public conversation with Programme Curator Mary Cremin, on the occasion of his solo exhibition The living and the dead at Temple Bar Gallery + Studios.

Saturday 22 April 2017 | 1pm

Free admission, booking essential. Further information available here.

Diana Copperwhite

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Virtú

Friday 7th of April – Sunday 21st of May, 2017

Diana Copperwhite will take part in a group exhibition at The Hunt Museum. Virtú is a curated exhibition that explores the ongoing relationship between The Hunt Museum and LSAD. The exhibition includes 18 contemporary artists working in various disciplines and a collection of drawings from several collections including IMMA and The Hunt Museum.

These two strands of the exhibition presented side by side provide a platform for creative dialogue and contemplation of the relevance of the Museum and its collection. These important collections of artists’ work spanning generations and cultures have had an influence on a younger generation of artists. This show aims to reveal that art among other things is a conversation.

Further information available here

Aspasia – An Influential Immigrant | Margaret Corcoran | 23.05 – 22.04 2017

Written by Ingrid Lyons on . Posted in Exhibitions

Aspasia was an influential immigrant to Classical-era Athens. She was the lover of the statesman Pericles and yet famed in her own right as an intellectual. As an outsider to the culture she entered, she thrived despite its restrictive citizenship laws.
Corcoran’s large, highly colourful canvases are bold and assertive, while the works on paper are sensitively rendered and acutely observed. She brings together an unlikely grouping of references celebrating love, creativity, ceremony and independence of thought.

The artist depicts figures such as Aspasia, Eileen Gray and D.H Lawrence alongside Sudanese courting couples and Bhutanese royalty. Their coexistence as subjects in the exhibition traces an idiosyncratic and tangential body of research that incorporates references to colonialism and to a striving for human dignity and equality. Aspasia – An Influential Immigrant celebrates unexpected congruence in the lives of people divided both historically and geographically.
As a complement to the wide-ranging subject matter, Corcoran utilises varying scales, techniques and paints to identify affinities and universal motifs in seemingly disparate lives.

A recent review of the exhibition in Frieze magazine can be read here.

Vanessa Donoso-López

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Vanessa Donoso-López, No Fixed Colour Continuum

CANDYLAND, | Gotlandsgatan 76 | 11638 Stockholm | Sweden

17.3–2.4 2017

No Fixed Colour Continuum represents this constant misconception leading to an often feeling of displacement, forcing oneself to look back at how life use to be or would be like back home.

Cross-cultural interaction begins and ends with difference; new places, new behaviour, new language. It may seem that the inherent variability of cross-cultural interaction and biculturalism prevents any patterns or generalisations from being established. What is established however, is not a universal model or fixed pattern, but a universal motion of balancing between two cultures, being near and far, being different and accepted.

The displacement of the individual to an unknown geografic space, as a deliberated act of placing oneself in an alien context, becomes a journey not only spatial but vital, it transforms the traveler in the fundamental protagonist of a challenge that often gets initiated with the acceptation of loneliness.

 

More information available here

Many-worlds interpretation…| Geraldine O’Neill | 16.02 – 18.03 2017

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 Many-worlds interpretation agus rudaí eile nach iad

 16.02 – 18.03 2017

The subjectivity of perception provides each individual with a measure of the world; the communication of these various measures defines reality. Each one of us is like an artist, continuously creating our own personal worldview often unaware of just how subjective it is. Heraclitus believed that the world was ‘one and many at the same time’; the tension held in this opposition is the tension inherent to life.

-Don Foresta, The many worlds of Art, Science and New Technologies, MIT Press, 1991.

Many-worlds interpretation agus rudaí eile nach iad is an exhibition of recent paintings by Geraldine O’Neill. Drawing on a wide variety of sources, she includes objects from within her household that have personal significance as well as images gleaned from the history of painting. Her emphatic use of children’s drawings, as well as the appearance of children as subjects within her compositions harks to the manner in which they come to terms with their world. Children often conflate playing, learning and dreaming and this is an important reference within the artist’s oeuvre. The content of O’Neill’s paintings constitute a collage through the history of image making as well as the personal history of the artist. These paintings are detailed and dense, replete with allegory and symbolism. Through her fascination with emblematic devices in northern renaissance painting O’Neill recalls motifs and iconography and considers them afresh.

In larger compositions she includes miniatures in the background – scenes unfolding and adding to the narrative of the painting. This device recalls the works of Dutch painter Hieronymus Bosch (1450-1515). In his paintings, a multitude of symbols contribute to the narrative. In Minion Man, O’Neill draws on the imagery from The Haywain Triptych by Bosch. On the closed exterior of the triptych, a wayfarer repels a dog with his stick. O’Neill pictures Bosch’s ‘wayfarer’ in a palimpsest of her own painted histories. While the wayfarer journeys forth, a young child looks outward; his eyes glazed in reverie. The appearance of the two figures together conjures ideas of exploration and the pursuit of knowledge through adventure and play. However there are also dangers lurking in the background and challenges ahead. The tension between these two worlds is a defining characteristic of the work and as such renders it both solemn and frivolous. As art historian Angela Griffith has noted in a recent article in Irish Arts Review;

Despite knowing the wider cultural, social and political contexts of the objects and artworks (re)presented, O’Neill does not create polemical works. Rather, through the beguiling visual properties of her paintings she seeks to draw the viewer out by drawing them in – compelling them to look, to see and, ultimately, think.

Within these paintings various realities co-exist creating a palimpsest where many worlds merge. By reproducing and combining images, as well as using different marks and gestures within the language of paint, O’Neill’s work adds a personal voice to an ongoing conversation that spans the history of western art to the present day.

Alice Maher

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Hybrid Histories: Alice Maher in conversation with Catherine Morris

Wednesday, March 15 at 6:00 PM7:00 PM

Mhairtin Ui Chadhain Theatre, AB 2041B, Trinity College, Dublin

Visarts will present world-renowned Irish artist Alice Maher, and author/former cultural co-ordinator of Trinity College, Catherine Morris, for a one of a kind event. ‘Hybrid Histories: Alice Maher in conversation with Catherine Morris’ will see two of Ireland’s most prominent names in Irish art and culture discuss Alice’s long and fruitful career in both Ireland and abroad, as well as her involvement with the Artist’s Campaign to Repeal the Eighth and other projects. There will be a Q&A session with the audience at the end of the talk whereby you are invited to ask questions of your own.

Admission is free, more information available here.

Aileen Murphy

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Aileen Murphy will take part in a group exhibition at Privateoffspace, Frankfurt am Main, Germany. The show curated by Henning Strassburger and titled Pressing your face in wet grass will also feature work by Stephanie Koesling, Elif Saydam, Anders Dickson, Maximilian Arnold, Jan Zöller and Zoe Field.

The exhibition runs April 7th until May 14th, 2017.

More information available here.

 

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Sean Lynch

The Douglas Hyde Gallery, Dublin

February 17 – April 5
Sean Lynch will present an exhibition of new work at the Douglas Hyde Gallery, Dublin. Lynch’s videos and installations bring attention to overlooked, misunderstood, farcical or fabricated chronicles and narratives. The photographs are accompanied by the Tau Cross of Kilnaboy, a national monument of great cultural significance, which has been temporarily relocated to the Douglas Hyde Gallery for the duration of the show.

More info

Altered Light | Kathlyn O’Brien | 12.01 – 11.02 2017

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Kathlyn makes detailed and idiosyncratic sculptures from a range of found and collected materials, often repurposing objects, salvaged and procured. Many of the structures appear shrine-like, maquettes that look like reliquaries to house treasured or sacred items. Altered Light presents a series of objects that have been transformed; they have borne metamorphosis through artistic intervention.

Many of these artworks offer us a glimpse into a world of making. They are the physical manifestation of thinking and dreaming through assemblage. Within these sculptures the external world and its structures mingle with the internal world of ideas. The work is buttressed by an instinctual understanding of architecture and carpentry. Kathlyn’s fluency with the handling of materials enables her to think through making and to project dream like structures directly from the inner eye into physical existence – she is a maker who thinks and dreams through the act of making.

Altered Light comprises a number of assemblages that are quiet and unassuming though powerful and resilient. This exhibition is the first solo exhibition of work by Kathlyn since 2011. Her work has often gone under the radar though not for her contemporaries. She has worked confidently over the years, untroubled by the flotsam and jetsam of art world trends. Within these strange objects is a world of ritual and respect that centers on the positive, regenerative aspect of destruction.

This is a particularly exquisite exhibition as the creation of these works span decades. Some works the artist has been developing gradually for years, some have been at stage of completion awaiting a final unknown component and others have been constructed in bursts of enthusiasm for fleeting thoughts. Kathlyn resurrects forgotten items and bestows on them a sense of renewed relevance. She gives them a second life.

 

Only connect | Ali Kirby & Christopher Mahon | 05.01 – 08.01 2017

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Kevin Kavanagh is pleased to present ‘only connect’, a two person exhibition of work from emerging artists Ali Kirby and Christopher Mahon.
The immediacy and ubiquity of digitized connectivity has revolutionized ways of interacting socially, romantically and in relation to inhabited spaces both public and private. Boundaries morph and fragment; between people, work, leisure, public and private space. Action, and experience, is fragmented.

Through a use of both traditional fine art techniques and materials, and those traditionally associated with architecture and building, Kirby and Mahon quietly underline the primal nature of, and need for, material connection: with our environment, and with others.

Through reliance on solid material and subtle architectural interventions, the seemingly paradoxical suggestion is made that to connect more, connect less: ground bodies – and all they can do – in visceral sensory experience.

Only connect!….Live in fragments no longer”

Ali Kirby (b. Dublin, Ireland) graduated in 2014 with first class honours in Fine Art from LSAD, specialising in Sculpture & Combined Media. Kirby is the recipient of the Fire Station Artist’s Studios Sculpture Workshop Award & Bursary 2016 and the RHA Studio Residency Award 2015. Recent exhibitions include all shimmers here (2016) MART Gallery, Dublin, Describing Architecture – Memory and Place (2015) City Assembly House, Dublin, the 185th RHA Annual Exhibition (2015) Royal Hibernian Academy, Dublin, Periodical Review #4 (2015) Ormston House, Limerick, Periodical Review #4 (2014) Pallas ProjectsDublin, Essays for the House of Memory (2014) Ormston House, Limerick, Single Channel (2013) Chartier Arts Venue, Connecticut, USA, Undertow (2012) the LAB, Dublin and Undertow (2011) Ormston House, Limerick.

Christopher Mahon (b.1988), recently completed an MA in Art and Research Collaboration, IADT (2016). Recent exhibitions include Illusions of Beloved Objects, Basic Space (2016), This is Public and Sexy, curated by RGKSKSRG, (2016).

Nevan Lahart & Paul McKinley

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Works by Nevan Lahart and Paul McKinley are included in this year’s Art of the State Exhibition 2016, entitled IAWATST. The exhibition opened in The Printworks, Dublin Castle in November and will travel to the The Alley Arts and Conference Centre in County Tyrone on December 13th before returning to The Lab in Dublin in February 2017.

Further information can be found here

 

Mick O’Dea

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Mick O’Dea will launch the exhibition, From Edge To Edge, in Glór, Ennis, Co.Clare on Friday December 9th at 6.30pm. The exhibition features work by Mick O’Dea, Aideen Barry, Brian Bourke, Barrie Cooke, John Gibbons, Seán Keating, Tom Molloy, Sidney Nolan, Deirdre O’Mahony, Jean Regan, Camille Souter and Samual Walsh.

More information can be found here

 

Alice Maher

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rwa_angela-carter_strange-worlds_alice-maher_cassandras-necklace_galleryWork by Alice Maher is being shown as part of Strange Worlds: The Vision of Angela Carter at the Royal West of England Academy, from December 10th 2016 – March 19th 2017.

More information can be found here.

Slips and Glimpses | Robert Armstrong & Anna Bjerger | 17.11 – 17.12 2016

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Painters have a complex relationship with their source material. While it provides them with vital information and can often stimulate certain illuminating reactions within them, it can also act as a self-imposed limit, which, once introduced, must be escaped from. Slips and Glimpses, an exhibition of new work by Anna Bjerger and Robert Armstrong delivers moments of both vivid immersion and profound escape.

Bjerger’s paintings often reference found imagery such as old magazine clippings. While the figures and objects which populate her paintings may seem largely unrelated, they are connected by a curious sense of timelessness. Or rather, that they exist in a time to which they do not belong. Through her paintings Bjerger provides a home for these displaced images, while simultaneously pointing to their outsider status. Their treatment is at once tender and removed. Cotton, for instance, depicts the torsos of two children wearing white t-shirts. One of the children’s t-shirts appears to be spattered with blood. But on closer inspection, the spatters extend extra-diegetically onto the t-shirt of the second child in a manner that could only have been made by the external hand of the painter. This deceptively simple gesture creates a mysterious tension between the world within the painting and that without. Such devices serve to both disorient and intrigue, allowing us glimpses into moments of great intimacy, to which we remain none the wiser.

Similarly, Armstrong’s paintings act as a space in which time and reality are made lusciously slippery. Drawing on sources such as masterworks from art history, ancient archeological sites and biblical narratives, Armstrong’s worlds both collide and withdraw. The cloud, a recurring motif in paintings such as A Cloud for Sigiriya and Humility after MW will often act as a unifier of these many worlds, bringing together earth and sky, figuration and abstraction, past and present, by floating or resting gently in their interim. Armstrong’s paintings search through the unknowable terrains of the past. But through his energetic and gleefully inventive use of paint, it is always the unforeseen, the strange, the new that emerges.

This exhibition combines the practices of two greatly accomplished painters, whose mutual admiration and respect for one another and for their chosen medium is distinctly evident. Through their work, both painters offer a surface on which content and materiality is treated with equal importance. Within these paintings, the origin and its varying forms of transition can safely co-exist, undisturbed by the passing of time and its consequences.

Anna Bjerger (b.1973) lives and works in Älmhult, Sweden. She has recently held solo exhibitions in David Risley Gallery, Copenhagen, 2016, Galleri Magnus Karlsson, Stockholm, 2015 and Galleria Monica de Cardenas, Milan, 2014. Her works are held in many collections, including Louisiana Museum of Modern Art (DK), Moderna Museet (SE), Zabludowicz Collection (UK) and Stedelijk Museum, (NE). Bjerger is represented by David Risley Gallery, Copenhagen and Galerie Magnus Karlsson, Stockholm.

Robert Armstrong (b.1953) lives and works in Dublin. Armstrong is Head of Painting in the National College of Art and Design and is a Founder Member of Temple Bar Gallery & Studios, Dublin. Recent solo exhibitions include a presentation at VOLTA New York (2015), and Assumptions (2014) Kevin Kavanagh Gallery, Dublin.

VUE | Dublin | 2016

Written by Ingrid Lyons on . Posted in Art Fairs

Kevin Kavanagh was pleased to participate in Vue Contemporary Art Fair at the Royal Hibernian Academy from November 3rd – 6th. The presentation featured work by Robert Armstrong, Dermot Seymour, Sonia Shiel, Sinéad Ní Mhaonaigh, Mick O’Dea, Diana Copperwhite, Alice Maher, Agnes De Vlin, Tadhg McSweeney and Kathy Tynan.

Ulrich Vogl

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ackk_rheinrad_abendsonne-web

Alongside Hannah Beck-Mannagetta, Ulrich Vogl has curated the exhibition Never Shown on Purpose, opening 4th November, running until 14th January in CIRCLE1, Berlin

Diana Copperwhite

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depend-on-the-morning-sun

Diana Copperwhite’s exhibition, Depend on the Morning Sun, runs from October 27th till December 17th in  Gallery Thomas Jaeckel, 532 W 25th St, New York

Mick O’Dea

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m-cullen-2Work by Mick O’Dea is on show in Real Real, as part of the Imagine Arts Festival, Waterford from 20th – 30th October. More information can be found here.

WI | Stephen Loughman | 13.10- 12.11 2016

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Kevin Kavanagh presents WI, an exhibition of new paintings by Stephen Loughman

 

And did those feet in ancient time
Walk upon England’s mountain green?
And was the holy Lamb of God
On England’s pleasant pastures seen?
And did the countenance divine
Shine forth upon our clouded hills?
And was Jerusalem builded here
Among those dark satanic mills?

– from Jerusalem by William Blake

 

WI comprises a suite of recent paintings by Stephen Loughman that take vintage postcards
issued by the Women’s institute as their source material and subject matter. The use of such
postcards, which were bought in bulk at online auctions, represent a departure from Loughman’s
previous method of painting from film stills and yet the work retains a filmic quality. Images of
the English countryside appear lushly detailed though curiously deadpan and while the source
material documents picturesque landscapes, their corresponding paintings appear densely
ominous, as plotted points within a broader narrative.

A history of the Women’s Institute spanning over one hundred years includes the suffragette
movement which began in 1913 as well as their contribution to the war effort during both World
War I and World War II. At the beginning of the 1920s the institution adopted Jerusalem as their
anthem. Originally written by William Blake in 1804, the poem celebrates ‘England’s green and
pleasant land’ and centers on rural countryside as the utopian ideal.

Within WI visual motifs become apparent; tunnels, bridges and arches reference architectural
intervention in the landscape as churches and thatched cottages are depicted amidst verdant
forests and gardens. In an art historical context the depiction of the English countryside has long
been bound up with national identity, and has continually acted as a cypher for collective
consciousness. In her book Wanderlust, Rebecca Solnit wrote, ‘At the beginning of the eighteenth
century, English aristocrats had linked nature with reason and the current social order, suggesting
that things were as they should be. But nature was a dangerous goddess to enthrone. At the latter
end of the century, Rousseau and romanticism equated nature, feeling, and democracy,
portraying the social order as highly artificial and making revolt against class privilege “only
natural” (Solnit, R, 2014, p109).

Loughman’s decision to work with postcards made by members of the Women’s Institute
alludes to the social history of an organisation in which the word ‘domestic’ has been applied not
only to the home but to the home country and the idea of nationhood. By referring to such
source material, Loughman connects aspirations towards patriotism and religion with the English
landscape and in this way the use of such imagery alludes to class structuring and social order.

Through time spent with Loughman’s paintings, it begins to emerge that a history has been
obfuscated or perhaps veneered. These seemingly idyllic images appear constricted – imbued
with a sense of unease or discomfort. The implication of such a device within WI attests to
Loughman’s ability to connect the depiction of rural England with its simultaneous social history
and, as in the artist’s previous work, to modify or drastically alter the mood or tone of an image
through the medium of paint.

Mick O’Dea

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odea-mick-stephen-821da1Mick O’ Dea’s portrait of Stephen McKenna is featured in ”Tradition and Innovation” a selection of work from the RHA collection as part of the Clifden Arts Festival. More information can be found here.