Author Archive

The world needs a narrative | Group Show | 26.09-18.10 2009

Written by Ingrid Lyons on . Posted in Exhibitions

Kevin Kavanagh is pleased to present The world needs a narrative, a group exhibition featuring Karin Brunnermeier, Henry Darger, Neil Farber, Tony Fitzpatrick, Michael Kalmbach, Basim Magdy, Jason McLean, Guy Richards Smit and Ken Solomon.

The world needs a narrative features works on paper by nine artists for whom the art of storytelling is central. The stories that they recount are varied – from autobiographical, psychological and fantastical modern day fables to sociological commentary and political satire.
Karin Brunnermeier’s drawings, sculptures and installations could be viewed as a series of intricate portraits. Brunnermeier’s characters and the stories that she creates around them, are based on the real and imagined and are central to the understanding of her work. Sometimes darkly humourous, melancholic, surreal or symbolic, her interest is in the human psyche and moments of ‘fracture’, where injuries, both physical and emotional occur.
Henry Darger was born in Chicago in 1892. Darger lived a solitary life, working as a janitor in a Chicago hospital from around the age of thirty until his retirement in 1963. During this time Darger created the work for which he is now known. Alone in his room, unknown to those around him, he gave tangible, visible form to an epic story of legions of pre-pubescent girls—with paper-doll faces and unexpected male organs—who battle for their lives against monstrous foes who seek to torture, kill or exploit them. This, his magnum opus, is commonly referred to as In the Realms of the Unreal, although Darger’s actual title is The Story of the Vivian Girls, in what is known as the Realms of the Unreal, of the Glandeco-Angelininian War Storm, Caused by the Child Slave Rebellion, and spans over 15,000 single-spaced typewritten pages. This expansive, complex narrative together with over 300 imaginatively constructed fantasy drawings have come to be regarded as one of the 20th century’s most original and unusual literary works.

Neil Farber´s surreal, obscure imagery with its varicoloured overpopulation of tiny people, frogs, rats, snakes, captured maidens, dragons, cats and ghosts belongs on the border line between childhood fear and grown-up fantasy and act as the basis for a dramatic description of the darker aspects of the human psyche. Aspects, which are disturbing and upsetting – perhaps even nightmarishly evil – but nonetheless serve as an integrated part of our identity.

Tony Fitzpatrick’s prints, drawings and collages are deeply autobiographical, defined, in part, by the gritty character of a working-class Chicago upbringing. His style is both dense and delicate, packed with fanciful imagery of animals and people. Fitzpatrick’s art typically blends cartoon-like drawings and found images such as baseball cards and matchbooks with poetic or narrative description. His stories, sometimes real sometimes imagined, involve monsters, call girls and gamblers – monsters, madness and vice – “the stuff they don’t put in the travel brochures” according to Fitzpatrick.

Michael Kalmbach’s watercolours and plaster sculptures have focused on the themes of family and childhood. Based on detailed original stories, his watercolours are populated with children and cherubs in dream-like states of weightlessness. Kalmbach’s picture worlds are anarchic and often politically incorrect, the more so since his protagonists are often children. But the fantasies which he realises in his pictures, sculptures and installations closely resemble those of children, growing up freely, filled with curiosity, tenderness but also cruelty.

Basim Magdy works with imagery derived from the mass media – images of conflict from TV, films, computer games and propaganda and the like- translating them, and finally reinterpreting them via the painting medium. Magdy’s generation never experienced war directly, instead growing up amidst naïve surrogates: violent toys – guns, knives, robots, tanks, soldiers, and computer games abound. Magdy capitalizes on the media-driven language, translating its imagery into contrived, attractive paintings, using a hyper-real aesthetic replete with bright, synthetic colours and simplistic motifs. He uses paint to question and redefine official versions of heroism, patriotism and collective memory.

The drawings of Vancouver based artist Jason McLean are heavily punctuated by humour, slogans and references to the mundane but specific details of everyday life. His frank impressions invite audiences to reconsider everyday experience as a dense psychological construct that unfolds over time and cannot be reduced to a single iconic image. His works could be seen to represent a mental space where the artist re-elaborates the flow of information which lays siege to us every day, a map of the neighbourhood as an urban space in flux.

Guy Richards Smit’s latest works create a stream of current political commentary, sexual innuendo and satire. As part of a larger ongoing series, Smit uses the layout of the cover and inside pages of The New York Times as the template for his watercolours and oils. Through headlines and article topics, Smit conveys his sharply observant cultural and political message. In these new works, Smit has directed his gaze firmly at the American political scene, his works undercut with philosophical observations and humour.

Ken Solomon’s recent work has explored the imagery and iconography of the U.S. postal system. At VOLTA NY 2008 Solomon set up an early voting bureau for the US Presidential elections, creating his own hand painted stamps of the Democratic and Republican nominees Barack Obama, Hillary Clinton, Mike Huckabee, John McCain, and Ralph Nader. He subsequently printed hundreds of sheets of stamps for the public to cast their vote. A meshing of mathematics and whimsy, for his envelope art works he uses an intensive process, pushing repetition to examine nuance. When each piece is finally complete the envelopes are subsequently mailed and disseminated to reconvene at the gallery, in certain instances having been on a long journey though the intricacies and idiosyncrasies of the US postal system. Solomon plays precise control and uncertainty together, allowing for third party mark making (the stamps, stickers or marker lines added by the post office) and the possibility of works getting lost. Each piece has its own special journey and individual story.

Solo Project | Basel | Gary Coyle |2008

Written by Ingrid Lyons on . Posted in Art Fairs

Kevin Kavanagh is pleased to present Gary Coyle;

In the past Gary Coyle has made charcoal drawings based on photographs of crime scenes, mug shots of convicted killers, sets of pornographic films and images culled from the contemporary mediascape. His images are dispassionately and precisely transcribed from their sources. The effect is forensic and downbeat, hyperreal rather than real as the distinction between reality and image becomes effaced. At its core, the fascination with violent crime that Coyle explores is ambivalent and voyeuristic.

In his recent exhibition Southside Gothic (2007) Coyle explored his fascination with death, Gothic and the sublime via his local environment of Dun Laoghaire, 7 miles south of Dublin. Over the past decade Coyle has continually explored his hometown via a variety of means including drawing, photography and performance. Since the summer of 1999 he has almost swam daily in the Irish Sea at Sandycove (beside the Martello tower which houses The James Joyce museum and where Ulysses begins). In a performance/ ritual he documents his swims using a waterproof camera, found objects, maps and notebooks.

Since 2000 Coyle has photographed places in Dun Laoghaire, mostly to do with death, and has written stories to accompany them. These images and texts eventually became Death in Dun Laoghaire – a slide show/ performance/ publication for which he received an Irish Arts Council Projects Grant and performed during the Dublin Fringe Festival in 2005 and again in 2006. In Death in Dun Laoghaire Coyle combined many of the themes and subjects he has explored in previous exhibitions such as crime scene photographs, the urban landscape and an interest in the every day and local.

Gary Coyle is a graduate of NCAD and the RCA London. Recent solo shows include Southside Gothic at Kevin Kavanagh Gallery (2007), Death in Dun Laoghaire performed at Project Arts Centre, Dublin (2006), The Wild Wild Wood (2004), The Floating World (2002), and Ad Marginem (2000). He has received various awards including Visual Arts Bursaries from the Arts Council of Ireland, 2005, 2003, 2001, & 1998, Ballinglen Fellowship 2003, Artists Work Programme IMMA 1997-8, The RHA annual drawing prize 1999 and 2007 and a Henry Moore Foundation Fellowship in 1995. Coyle is currently working on an Arts Council of Ireland/ Project Arts Centre commission to write and present a performance based around his daily swimming ritual which will be presented to the public in October 2008. In 2010 Coyle will have a major solo exhibition at the Royal Hibernian Academy, Dublin.

 

ID&A | Dublin | 2008

Written by Ingrid Lyons on . Posted in Art Fairs

The Kevin Kavanagh Gallery opened in 1999 at its current location in Great Strand Street in the centre of Dublin. The Gallery is currently housed in a converted industrial space north of the River Liffey.

During the summer of 2008 the Kevin Kavanagh Gallery will move to a new 125 m²premises south of the river, designed by architect Philip Crowe of MCO Architecture, Dublin.

The gallery represents established Irish artists whilst actively supporting the work of emerging younger artists from Ireland and abroad.

 

Art Cologne | 2008

Written by Ingrid Lyons on . Posted in Art Fairs

Robert Armstrong|Karin Brunnermeier | Sinéad Ní Mhaonaigh | Mark O’Kelly | Mark Swords | Ulrich Vogl

16 – 20 April 2008

 

 

 

Michael Boran -Voyager

Written by Ingrid Lyons on . Posted in Publications

Front-Cover06 March – 29 March 2008

Text: Caoimhin Mac Giolla Leith
Design & Production: Tom Feehan
Printing & Reproduction : Rosbeek, Netherlands
Edition of 1000
ISBN 978-0-9555164-6-7
Published by Kevin Kavanagh (2008)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Better is something you Build

Written by Ingrid Lyons on . Posted in Publications

Better-is-something-you-buildCurated by Jacqui McIntosh

7 February – 1 March 2008

Text: Jacqui McIntosh
Design: Tom Feehan
Photography: Jacqui McIntosh
Printing & Reproduction: Rosbeek, Netherlands
Edition of 1000
ISBN 978-0-9555164-7-4
Published by Kevin Kavanagh

ARCO | Madrid | 2008

Written by Ingrid Lyons on . Posted in Art Fairs

Diana Copperwhite | Michael Boran | Stephen Loughman

Arco, Madrid || Stand A40.F34

The Kevin Kavanagh Gallery opened in 1999 at its current location in Great Strand Street in the centre of Dublin. The Gallery is housed in a converted industrial space north of the River Liffey. Over the past 8 years, Kevin Kavanagh Gallery has established itself as a leading Irish commercial gallery. The gallery represents established Irish artists whilst actively supporting the work of emerging younger artists from Ireland and abroad

For more information please click for Arco Catalogue
 

AQUA | Miami | 2007

Written by Ingrid Lyons on . Posted in Art Fairs

Mark-Swords_Head-&-Collage_-Installation-Shot-at-Kevin-Kavanagh

Diana Copperwhite | Mark Swords | Mark Kelly

Aqua Miami || 4 – 9 December 2007 || Booth 4

The Kevin Kavanagh Gallery opened in 1999 at its current location in Great Strand Street in the centre of Dublin. The Gallery is housed in a converted industrial space north of the River Liffey. Over the past 9 years, Kevin Kavanagh Gallery has established itself as a leading Irish commercial gallery. The gallery represents established Irish artists whilst actively supporting the work of emerging younger artists from Ireland and abroad.

Stephen Loughman & Mark O’Kelly

Written by Ingrid Lyons on . Posted in Publications

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07 December 2007 –  26 January 2008
Galway Arts Centre,Ireland

Text: Hugo Hamilton, Maeve Mulrennan
Design: Neil Gurry
Photography: Vincent Lestienne, Paul McCarthy
Printing & Reproduction: Drukkerij Rosbeek
Edition of 1000
ISBN 978-0-9555164-5-0
Published by Kevin Kavanagh (2007)

ART Projects | London | 2007

Written by Ingrid Lyons on . Posted in Art Fairs

Robert Armstrong | Michael Boran | Gemma Browne | Oliver Comerford |Diana Copperwhite | Margaret Corcoran | Gary Coyle | Nevan Lahart | Stephen Loughman | Bongi MacDermott | Tadhg McSweeney | Sinéad Ní Mhaonaigh | Mark O’Kelly | Geraldine O’Neill | Amy O’Riordan |David Quinn | Dermot Seymour | Mark Swords | Ulrich Vogl

Art Projects, London – 2007

Art Projects returns for its second year showcasing 58 international galleries set in the historic building of County Hall. Inviting galleries from over 11 countries with a non hierarchical policy and curatorial freedom galleries from over eleven countries will be exhibiting young and established artists, housed in the Edwardian oak anelled rooms over looking the river Thames and Houses of Parliament.

 

County Hall, Westminster Bridge

11 – 14  October 2007

 

 

 

Tadhg Mc Sweeney – What Remains

Written by Ingrid Lyons on . Posted in Publications

What-Remains-(Complete26

Sligo Art Gallery
October – 24 November 2007

Text:Aidan Dunne
Design:Tom Feehan at Dynamite
Photography:Tadhg Mc Sweeney
Edition of 750
ISBN 978-0-9555164-8-1
Published by Kevin Kavanagh

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Edifice Complex

Tadhg McSweeney
2 February- 21 April 2013
Text: Eamonn Maxwell,Aidan Dunne, Emma Lucy O’Brien and Carissa Farrell

Intreview: Eamonn Maxwell and Tadhg McSweeney

Photography:Tadhg Mc Sweeney and Ros Kavanagh
Edition of 500
ISBN 978-1-907537-09-7

Published by VISUAL Centre for Contemporary Art

Docks Art Fair | Lyon | Nevan Lahart |2007

Written by Ingrid Lyons on . Posted in Art Fairs

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Nevan Lahart | Booth C8

Docks, Lyon |17 – 23 September 2007

Nevan Lahart works in a wide variety of media, often using humble and cheap materials to create expansive installations. The subject matter of his work revolves around a critical, satirical and often humorous commentary on current affairs, television, the media, social and political perceptions and the history of art delivered in an unflinching, often confrontational tongue-in-cheek manner.

For more information please click for Catalogue

Dermot Seymour – Eyed

Written by Ingrid Lyons on . Posted in Publications

Dermot-Catalogue-Landscape-2_Layout-1-1

14 September – 20 October 2007

 

Text: Niamh Ann Kelly
Design: Ronan Devlin / Little Seal
Photography: Jaqui McIntosh
Printed by: Hudson Kileen
Edition of 750
ISBN 978-0-9555164-4-3
Published by Kevin Kavanagh (2007)

ID&A | Dublin | 2007

Written by Ingrid Lyons on . Posted in Art Fairs

Dublin-art-fair_10The Kevin Kavanagh Gallery opened in 1999 at its current location in Great Strand Street in the centre of Dublin. The Gallery is housed in a converted industrial space north of the River Liffey. Over the past 8 years, Kevin Kavanagh Gallery has established itself as a leading Irish commercial gallery. The gallery represents established Irish artists whilst actively supporting the work of emerging younger artists from Ireland and abroad.

Arco, Madrid – 2007

Written by Ingrid Lyons on . Posted in Art Fairs

Diana Copperwhite |Gemma Browne | Amy O’ Riordain

Arco, Madrid || Stand PR 08

he Future is Female brings together three young Irish artists. Each of these artists explores ideas of feminity within their work and what it is to be a woman in this world. Through the media of painting, drawing and photography, ideas of consumerism, advertising, love, sex, memory and innocence are explored. What connects all artists is a certain confidence, vibrant use of colour and assertiveness of image making.

The paintings of Gemma Browne capture the freshness and possibilities of youth. The vivid blue backgrounds are reminiscent of endless warm summers, of happier times fully of possibilty. Similarites can be seen in each of the works, creating uniformity. Each girl differs slightly – a different outfit, a different smile – yet behind the smiles, there is knowingness, a confidence. The individual loses her fixed identity within the crowd.

Whether painting from sources that are deeply personal, or images from mass media, Diana Copperwhite’s paintings relate strongly to memory. How we see, how we remember and how we know, are the themes which weave through her work – her paintings r
evealing a glimpse of a parallel universe balanced between the remembered and real, the abstract and representational.

Sugar for the eye instead of the tongue, Eye Candy is not all prettiness and sweetness. Beneath the lipstick and gloss, Amy O’Riordan’s images say much more. Large-scale photographic self-portaits and studies display the colourful excesses of fashion and consumerism, creating vibrant and richly detailed images.

The Gallery would like to acknowledge the support of Culture Ireland.

 

 

 

Ulrich Vogl – Extension of Drawing

Written by Ingrid Lyons on . Posted in Publications

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Text: Aidan Dunne, Julia Trolp & Annette Pussert
Design:Musterfirma, Ulrike Bruckner, Berlin
Photography: Andreas Brucklmair, John Kellett, Uudam Nguyen, Lidia Tirri, Christoph Wagner
Printed:  Kraska Eckstein
Translations: Daniel O’Donnell & Matthias Wolf
Edition : 1000
ISBN 978-0-9552525-6-3
Published by Kevin Kavanagh (2007)

Un salon par Mick O’Dea

Written by Ingrid Lyons on . Posted in Publications

un-Salon-par-Mick-O'DeaCentre Culturel Irlandais Paris

30 November 2006 – 12 January 2007

Text: Helen Carey & Aidan Dunne
Design: Ronan Devlin
Photography: Fico Photographe, Barbara Laborde, Jaqui Mc Intosh & Amelia Stein
Printing and Reproduction – Drukkerij Rosbeek, Nuth
Edition 1000
ISBN 978-0-9552525-8-7
Published by Kevin Kavanagh (2007)

 

 

 

 

 

Displaying photo.JPGAudience

Mick O’Dea

June/July 2004

Printed by Hudson Killeen, Glasnevin, Dublin

Photogra[hy by Gillian Buckley

Designed by rising Design and Communications

ISBN 01-8550663